Warren Sack is a media theorist, software designer, and artist whose work explores theories and designs for online public space and public discussion. He is Professor of Film + Digital Media at the University of California, Santa Cruz where he teaches digital arts and digital studies. His artwork has been exhibited by SFMOMA (San Francisco), the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York), the New Museum of Contemporary Art (New York), the Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), and the ZKM (Karlsruhe, Germany). His recent book, The Software Arts (MIT Press, 2019), is an alternative history of software that places the arts at the very center of software’s evolution. Bonnie Honig is Nancy Duke Lewis Professor of Modern Culture and Media (MCM) and Political Science at Brown University. Her most recent book is Public Things: Democracy in Disrepair (Fordham 2017). Her books Antigone, Interrupted (Cambridge 2013) and Emergency Politics (Princeton, 2009) draw on Arendt and others to ask how to think and act in emergency settings. Her latest books are: A Feminist Theory of Refusal (Harvard University Press, 2021) and Shellshocked: Feminist Criticism After Trump (Fordham, 2021).She is an affiliate of the Digital Democracy Group at Simon Fraser University and Senior Research Affiliate at the American Bar Foundation, Chicago. Jenny Reardon is a Professor of Sociology and the Founding Director of the Science and Justice Research Center at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research draws into focus questions about identity, justice and democracy that are often silently embedded in scientific ideas and practices, particularly in modern genomic research. Her most recent book, The Postgenomic Condition: Ethics, Justice, Knowledge After the Genome (Chicago University Press, Fall 2017), draws upon Arendt to understand the problem of transforming genomic data into meaningful public knowledge. She is the recipient of fellowships and awards from, among others, the National Science Foundation, the Max Planck Institute, the Freiburg Institute of Advanced Study, the Humboldt Foundation, and the United States Congressional Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

Conditions: Warren Sack in conversation with Jenny Reardon and Bonnie Honig

Warren Sack, Jenny Reardon and Bonnie Honig

Volume 4Article 10

Conditions: Warren Sack in conversation with Jenny Reardon and Bonnie Honig

Warren Sack, Jenny Reardon and Bonnie Honig

Volume 4Article 10 Download

Conditions: Warren Sack in conversation with Jenny Reardon and Bonnie Honig

Warren Sack, Jenny Reardon and Bonnie Honig
Volume 4/Article 10 Download
Warren Sack is a media theorist, software designer, and artist whose work explores theories and designs for online public space and public discussion. He is Professor of Film + Digital Media at the University of California, Santa Cruz where he teaches digital arts and digital studies. His artwork has been exhibited by SFMOMA (San Francisco), the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York), the New Museum of Contemporary Art (New York), the Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), and the ZKM (Karlsruhe, Germany). His recent book, The Software Arts (MIT Press, 2019), is an alternative history of software that places the arts at the very center of software’s evolution. Bonnie Honig is Nancy Duke Lewis Professor of Modern Culture and Media (MCM) and Political Science at Brown University. Her most recent book is Public Things: Democracy in Disrepair (Fordham 2017). Her books Antigone, Interrupted (Cambridge 2013) and Emergency Politics (Princeton, 2009) draw on Arendt and others to ask how to think and act in emergency settings. Her latest books are: A Feminist Theory of Refusal (Harvard University Press, 2021) and Shellshocked: Feminist Criticism After Trump (Fordham, 2021).She is an affiliate of the Digital Democracy Group at Simon Fraser University and Senior Research Affiliate at the American Bar Foundation, Chicago. Jenny Reardon is a Professor of Sociology and the Founding Director of the Science and Justice Research Center at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research draws into focus questions about identity, justice and democracy that are often silently embedded in scientific ideas and practices, particularly in modern genomic research. Her most recent book, The Postgenomic Condition: Ethics, Justice, Knowledge After the Genome (Chicago University Press, Fall 2017), draws upon Arendt to understand the problem of transforming genomic data into meaningful public knowledge. She is the recipient of fellowships and awards from, among others, the National Science Foundation, the Max Planck Institute, the Freiburg Institute of Advanced Study, the Humboldt Foundation, and the United States Congressional Committee on Science, Space and Technology.